Sep 192013
 

Tagged & Unregistered Frame Diagram

Recently found myself troubleshooting Untagged and Unregistered frame filtering on an Avaya Ethernet Routing Switch. This is a quick tutorial for future discussions with other engineers about how filtering works on an Avaya Ethernet Switch.

A quick description of tagged vs registered:

  • A tagged frame is a frame which has an 802.1q VLAN ID tag on the packet.
  • A registered frame is a frame which has an 802.1q VLAN ID tag on the packet that matches the VLAN MEMBERS configuration on the port.

In the above diagram, if the packet egressing from the first data switch is tagged with VLAN 10 (PVID or Primary VLAN ID 10), then the packet is both tagged and registered when it ingresses on the second data switch. However, if the packet is tagged with VLAN 20, the packet is tagged but unregistered when it ingresses on the second data switch.

Use of untagged filtering or unregistered filtering is for environments where the administrator wishes to protect against mistakes in recabling network devices or vlan configuration mistakes. One of the historical issues that has happened in the past with Nortel Ethernet Routing Switches is that if an unregistered frame is received and the receiving data switch does not know what to do with it, it may divert the packet to VLAN 1 (the default VLAN ID on all data switches). This can result in accidental broadcasts of extraneous packets.

A few examples of network changes that might result in problems:

  • Accidentally connecting a server to the second data switch trunk port– the server packets are filtered by filter-untagged-frame enable.
  • Accidentally connecting a different data switch to the second data switch trunk port– if the vlan membership and PVID settings are different, the server packets can be filtered by filter-untagged-frame or filter-unregistered frame.
  • The first data switch is factory reset or the trunk port is configured with VLAN membership that need not be extended to the second data switch– if the 802.1q VLAN ID on the packet is not one of the VLAN member IDs on the ingress port, then the packet will be filtered by filter-unregistered-frame. If the first data switch port is configured as a non-trunk port (any other tagging configuration: tagging untagpvidonly, tagging untagall, tagging tagpvidonly) and the packet is untagged and sent to the second data switch, then the filter-untagged-frame setting may cause the packet to be filtered on ingress.

Michael McNamara posted an article back in 2007 discussing an issue with Avaya IP Phones where filter-unregistered-frame enable caused problems with IP Phone registration. The relevant excerpt is as follows:

The option (vlan ports 1-46 filter-unregistered-frames disable) was added after an issue was discovered when trying to upgrade the firmware on the IP phones. The filter-unregistered-frames is enabled by default and should be disabled to avoid and issues with upgrading the firmware on the IP phones. We are attempting to investigate further with Nortel and our voice vendor…

Take away:

  • The way I read the documentation, and I haven’t had a lot of opportunity to thoroughly test this, filtering is ingress only. This means you’re consuming bandwidth with improper egress port configuration. Depending on your environment, this wasted bandwidth might be minor or major.
  • Use of VLAN ID is strongly frowned upon in a multiple VLAN environment. Don’t assign PVID 1 or VLAN ID to any ports (i.e., remove VLAN 1 from all ports, because VLAN ID 1 is on everything in factory default configurations.) If you’re not doing any VLANing or any Layer 3 routing (i.e., simply Layer 2 switching only), then VLAN ID 1 is fine– but as soon as you start tagging packets on that switch you should stop using VLAN ID 1.
  • Filtering is best used on trunk ports to prevent broadcast storms or extraneous packets from being broadcast into a data switch (and the impact of extraneous packets from diverted unregistered frames is minimized if you do not use VLAN ID 1.)

What to do with this information:

  • Review all ports for VLAN membership or PVID of 1– if found and if you are a multi-VLAN environment, convert VLAN ID 1 to another VLAN ID on all ports then remove VLAN ID 1 from all ports (including PVID 1).
  • Review all ports set with tagging tagAll (including multi-link trunk (MLT) ports)
    • Compare VLAN membership and PVID settings on each side of a trunk connection.
    • Make sure VLAN membership matches on both sides.
    • Make sure the PVID ID on each side is a VLAN member on the opposite side.
    • Make sure the PVIDs match on both sides (I can’t think of any valid design reasons why PVIDs might not match.)
  • Review all trunk ports (tagging tagAll) and set filter-untagged-frame enable
  • Review all trunk ports (tagging tagAll) and set filter-unregistered-frame enable
  • Review all non-trunk ports (access ports) and set filter-untagged-frame and filter-unregistered-frame based on the network design
    • Note: If the port will not be receiving 802.1q tagged packets on ingress, then filter-untagged-frame and filter-unregistered-frame should be disabled.